LNG vaporization with The Phazer – LNG Probe-Vaporizer

LNG vaporization

LNG vaporization with the Phazer. The only Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer that provides verifiably accurate and representative LNG samples from as low as 0,5 barg.

Phazer 1.1 LNG vaporization with The Phazer - LNG probe-vaporizer product photo
The Phazer 1.1 – LNG Probe-Vaporizer with shut-off valve.
  • The Phazer conforms to ISO 8943:2007 and surpasses NEN-EN 12838:2000.
  • The Phazer minimizes LNG transfer time at FSRU’s.
  • The Phazer is available in a wide array of models to suit your (process) specific needs.
  • The Phazer has no moving parts.
  • The Phazer provides accurate and representative LNG samples from 0,5 barg.

ASaP is a leading company specializing in the engineering and manufacturing of cutting-edge LNG Custody Transfer Systems (CTMS), LNG Probe-Vaporizers, advanced LNG Samplers, and precise NG analysis systems.

LNG vaporizer and sample probe

Time is money! Every hour an LNG carrier can sail away earlier from a FSRU, will have a significant positive financial impact. So, it is important that an LNG FSRU can always operate at its maximum flow rate to minimize transfer time. Consequently, the sampling pressure at the cross-over manifold at the FSRU ‘s will be at its minimum, in practice it can be lower than 1 barg.

The sampling for LNG custody transfer is done by means of an LNG vaporizer and sample probe connected to a sample container and on-line analyzer. The location of the sampling point(s) is at the cross-over manifold. Nearly all analytical sampling systems until now operated at pressures above 2,5 barg.

The Phazer LNG vaporizer and sample probe, is as the name implies a combined LNG vaporizer with a sampling probe for direct mounting on the transfer line. The Phazer operates at any LNG pressure and vaporized samples allowing analysis with the lowest uncertainty. It has proven its outstanding performance at LNG pressures of 0,5 barg at tests and during ship-to-ship transfers. The total measurement (LNG vaporizer, LNG Sampler and analyzer) standard deviation during the ship-to-ship was just 0,0019 MJ/Nm3!

The Catch-22 is: lose money on waiting time of the LNG carrier (increase the pressure by squeezing flow), or lose money on inaccurate LNG analysis?

Guaranteed LNG vaporization results

LNG vaporization with the Phazer eliminates any uncertainty of your LNG sample quality. It is the most accurate, reliable and flexible LNG vaporizer available.

A huge milestone for our LNG vaporizer. The Phazer LNG Probe-Vaporizer has been successfully installed more than 100 times worldwide! We owe this great achievement to our engineering and sales teams.

Design of our LNG vaporizer and probe

The Phazer LNG Probe-Vaporizer conforms to ISO 8943:2007 and surpasses NEN-EN 12838:2000. Your LNG measurement is only as accurate as your provided sample…

  • Conforms to ISO 8943:2007 and surpasses NEN-EN 12838:2000.
  • Close-coupled to process LNG transfer line.
  • Flash vaporization.
  • Integrated Zero Dead Volume Accumulator™
  • Simple installation.
  • Small footprint.
    • 100 x 20 cm (40” x 8”).
    • approximately 50 kg (110 lb).
  • Low weight.
    • Direct installation on LNG transfer line.
    • Minimize EPC, SI and installation effort.
  • No moving parts.
  • Low to high sample pressure.
  • Low duty cycle LNG vaporizer.
    • Practically maintenance free.
    • Bare minimum of spare parts required.
Phazer 1.1 LNG vaporization with The Phazer - LNG probe-vaporizer product photo
Diagram of our LNG vaporizer and probe.

LNG vaporization project satisfied customer

ASaP review stars

“At the request of ASaP this letter may serve as reference.

It is the most advanced design which is currently commercially available on the market. It is the only LNG vaporizer and sampling system which take care for a subcooling of the sample before vaporization. The flange connection avoids any unnecessary heat leak on the sample transfer to the LNG vaporizer system. Due to the flexible design on the orifice and heater system, the flow can be easily adjusted to the process requirements as well as to the required flow rate to overcome the natural heat input to the sample.

There are no moving parts, and it is flexible in configuration. Installation work on site is expected to be kept to a minimum. Operational and maintenance costs are predicted to be minimal. The ASaP solution appears to be the perfect match for a happy customer from the Middle East with regards to technical requirements, flexibility and planning. A return on investment of 1 to 2 weeks is predicted.

The functionality of the system was tested, and the outcome is above expectation. Even without proper insulation on the transfer part, the contact temperature on the bottom part (close to the hot section) was found to be below -150°).”

– Quote from the Factory Acceptance Test (FAT)

Recent LNG vaporization projects

Snam Acquires BW LNG’s FSRU, ASaP supplies Phazers

Snam, an Italian energy firm, has recently completed the acquisition of BW LNG’s FSRU, named BW Singapore, for approximately $400 million. This strategic move is set to enhance Italy’s energy security and supply diversification. ASaP will play a pivotal role in this project by equipping the FSRU with two advanced Phazers 1.0, supplied through Global Gas Solutions. These Phazers, exclusive to ASaP, feature a combination of an LNG probe and vaporizer with patented active sub-cooling technology. This ensures the complete prevention of partial and pre-vaporization of LNG in all conditions, ensuring superior analytical performance of the FSRU.

BW Singapore FSRU - Snam Acquires BW LNG’s FSRU, Equipped with ASaP Technology, to Boost Italy's Energy Security

Golar’s FLNG Hilli Achieves 100th Cargo with ASaP-tech

Golar’s FLNG Hilli, stationed offshore Cameroon’s Kribi, has recently marked a significant milestone by offloading its 100th cargo of liquefied natural gas since commencing operations in 2018. This achievement is not just a testament to Golar’s expertise but also highlights the critical role of ASaP’s technology onboard. ASaP has equipped the FLNG Hilli with two advanced Phazers 1.1 with shut-off valves and one ISO 8943 intermittent LNG Sampling System. These cutting-edge systems, unique to ASaP, combine an LNG probe and vaporizer with patented active sub-cooling technology, ensuring the prevention of partial and pre-vaporization of LNG under all conditions, thus guaranteeing optimal analytical performance.

Golar's FLNG Hilli Achieves 100th LNG Cargo Milestone with ASaP Technology Onboard

ASaP’s technologies fuel Ruhe Bio-LNG Plant in Germany

ASaP has made a significant contribution to the Ruhe Group’s latest venture in the bio-LNG sector by delivering a state-of-the-art MicroPhazer. This unique ASaP product combines an LNG probe and vaporizer with patented active sub-cooling technology, ensuring the prevention of partial and pre-vaporization of LNG under all conditions. This guarantees optimal analytical performance, essential for the precision required in bio-LNG production. Alongside this, we’ve provided an analytical system equipped with natural gas chromatographs for measuring the composition of vaporized LNG samples. Furthermore, our delivery includes AIM (Analytical Information Module), a preventive maintenance operation system that continuously monitors the performance of the entire LNG custody transfer system, including gas chromatographs and detectors.

Drone photo of the bio-LNG plant in Parmen. ASaP's technologies fuel Ruhe Bio-LNG Plant in Germany

ASaP Equips Golar’s FLNG Gimi

ASaP has proudly supplied key equipment for Golar LNG’s newly converted floating LNG producer, the FLNG Gimi, set to play a vital role in BP’s Greater Tortue Ahmeyim FLNG project offshore Mauritania and Senegal. Our contribution includes two advanced Phazers 1.1 with shut-off valves. The Phazer, a unique brand offering from ASaP, combines an LNG probe and vaporizer featuring patented active sub-cooling technology. This ensures prevention of partial and pre-vaporization of LNG under all conditions, guaranteeing optimal analytical performance. Additionally, we’ve provided one ISO 8943 intermittent LNG Sampling System, further solidifying our commitment to this groundbreaking project.

ASaP Equips Golar's FLNG Gimi

Höegh Esperanza FSRU – Flawless LNG Sampler inspection

In the second quarter of 2023 Analytical Solutions and Products (ASaP) completed an LNG Sampler System for the Höegh Esperanza (FSRU Floating Storage Regasification Unit). Including probe vaporizers, LNG sampling cabinet, preventive maintenance operating system, natural gas analyzers, and calibration gas facilities.

Höegh Esperanza FSRU - ASaP LNG Sampling System FAT Factory Acceptance Test - From ASaP Bart Berkhout and Peter Kearney

Made to measure

AUGUST 2023 ISSUE OF LNG INDUSTRY Hans-Peter Visser, Analytical Solutions and Products B.V., the Netherlands, outlines the needs for fully automated LNG custody transfer measurement systems. Custody transfer refers to the process …

August 2023 issue of LNG Industry

LNG Terminals over the world: Complete list and map 2024

The emergence of the natural gas industry has paved the way for the development of an intricate network of LNG terminals across the globe. While LNG might seem like a modern commodity, its roots stretch far back in history, and its potential, even further into the future. This article dives deep into the landscape of LNG import and export terminals, the influential companies steering their course, and provides insights into the foundational questions surrounding the LNG industry.

LNG Terminals over the world An interactive LNG map

Time is Money, Accuracy is Money, and ASaP’s LNG solutions secure both

So, minimize the time of the LNG carrier at a jetty and its voyage. With every BTU accurately measured, profits can be maximized by using ASaP’s LNG solutions.

Price of LNG goes stratospheric. Will LNG shipping rates follow

GAS Entec LNG custody transfer system for AG&P

In the second quarter of 2022 Analytical Solutions and Products (ASaP) delivered a complete LNG custody transfer system for Adnoc’s Floating Storage Unit (FSU) converted by GAS Entec. Adnoc’s floating LNG storage unit is converted to serving the AG&P LNG import terminal in the Philippines.

The Phazer LNG Probe Vaporizer in the complete LNG custody transfer system for Adnoc's Floating Storage Unit (FSU) converted by GAS Entec

Not just LNG. The Phazer is available for all cryogenic applications

The Phazer is available in a wide array of models of Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizers to suit all your cryogenic applications.

The Phazer Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 1.0 for LNG custody transfer.
The Phazer – Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 1.0 for LNG custody transfer.
The Phazer Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 1.1 with shut-off valve for LNG custody transfer.
The Phazer – Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 1.1 with shut-off valve for LNG custody transfer.
The MicroPhazer Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 2.0
The MicroPhazer – Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 2.0
The MicroPhazer Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 2.1 with shut-off valve.
The MicroPhazer – Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 2.1 with shut-off valve.
Cryogenic vaporizer and probe - The Phazer Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 4.0 BOG
The Phazer – Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 4.0 for BOG (Boil Off Gas).
Cryogenic vaporizer and probe - The Phazer Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 4.1 BOG with shut-off valve
The Phazer – Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 4.1 shut-off valve for BOG (Boil Off Gas).
The Phazer Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 3.0 for small scale applications.
The Phazer – Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 3.0 for small scale applications.
The MicroPhazer Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer Model 2.0
And more models for LNG, LH2, LCO2, LHe, and HC cryogenic applications.

Phazer Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer model overview

Table with model overview of the Phazer - Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer
Table with model overview of the Phazer – Cryogenic Probe-Vaporizer

Our LNG solutions are tested under process conditions

ASaP is actively participating in (re)writing LNG and other International Standards. Therefore, the need for testing is well embedded in the ASaP organization.

For the Dutch metrology institute, VSL, ASaP designed, built and tested the first and only commercially available test unit according to EN 12838: 2000. For internal tests ASaP has designed and built 2 generations of test units.

With new market developments emerging, like optical in situ measurements based on Raman and Infrared spectroscopy. ASaP’s 3rd generation test unit is able to test two identical or different devices simultaneously to determine both their uncertainty as well as the differences between two devices and/or analytical methods under identical, controlled and simulated process conditions.

ASaP LNG Test Unit with Phazer LNG probe-vaporizer. Our LNG solutions are tested under process conditions
ASaP LNG Test Unit with the Phazer LNG Probe-Vaporizer. Our LNG solutions are tested under process conditions.

Field study – LNG vaporization with LNG probe vaporizers

For the trade of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) the price is based upon the energy content in the LNG1. The accuracy of the energy content determination is therefore of the utmost importance. Small differences in the measured concentrations are multiplied by the volume of the transfer and could be of significant value. In this article we will discuss the common pitfalls in LNG vaporization and sampling for analysis as introduction in the subject. This LNG vaporizer field study is based upon the experimental comparison of two vaporizing probes in a true field situation.

Sampling LNG has more than a few challenges, among the most important are pre-vaporization and partial vaporization. Both of these challenges are closely connected to the cryogenic nature of the sample. Described in ISO 8943:20072, the sampled LNG needs to be in a liquid sub-cooled state, that is at a lower temperature than the boiling point at that pressure. The risk is that due to the very low boiling point of the LNG any heat transfer into the system can readily cause vaporization.

Figure 1 Schematic showing the boiling point and bubble curve for a two component mixture.
Figure 1 Schematic showing the boiling point and bubble curve for a two component mixture.

LNG is a mixture of components therefore we do not have a precise boiling point. Figure 1 depicts a schematic representation of a bubble point curve for a two components mixture. The bubble point curve of a mixture shows the temperature at which the liquid starts to boil. Consequently, the components vapor pressures determine the concentration ratios in the gas relative to the liquid. Based upon this principle is fractional distillation3. In the field this could happen in case a sample line is poorly isolated, and the liquid is heated to the bubble point curve and vaporized. This temperature is also represented on the dew point curve, which means the vapor could condense in a different composition depending on the LNG vapor pressures. For LNG we would expect higher methane readings in the gas than in the liquid, for the vapor pressure of methane>ethane>propane4–6.

The heat causing the LNG to pre-vaporize could come from the vaporizer upstream that heats up the tubing, poor isolation, or excess ambient heat. The heat influx is not necessarily enough to fully vaporize the LNG, which would result in any variation of two phase flow7–9 and an inhomogeneous sample. In my experience heat influx is mainly caused by bad isolation on a sample line, easily recognized by ice formation10. This phenomenon influences both the composition and the homogeneity of the sample. One of the solutions provided to address this problem is LNG vaporization with a probe vaporizer setup. These kinds of vaporizers are directly connected to the LNG sample probes which is installed in the subcooled process liquid. An example is shown in Figure 2, noticeably there is no sample line for the liquid reducing the opportunity for pre-vaporization.

Partial vaporization takes place inside the vaporizer and has the same effect as pre-vaporization. Incomplete boiling generates a gas with a different composition than the liquid. This could be caused by a bad vaporizer design, insufficient heat capacity, dead volume, or incorrect flow settings. During the vaporization of methane, the volume expands by a factor 232 (1.013 barg at boiling point), if then immediately heated to 288K it expands by a factor 621. Pressure regulators reduce the flow depending on the output pressure. The increase in volume creates pressure that could stop the flow in the vaporizing pressure regulator, this situation maintains partial vaporization and heat flux upstream.

The analytical result of pre- and partial vaporization is a loss in sample homogeneity and representability, expressed as precision and accuracy respectively. The influence on the composition would lead to an increased measured concentration of components with a higher vapor pressure, and a decreased measured concentration of components with a lower vapor pressure. Lastly the calculated results, such as the Gross Heating Value (GHV), would change with the composition. GHV would decrease in a system where pre- or partial vaporization is present.

Field study experimental details

In this field study of LNG vaporizers two commercially available LNG sample probe systems are compared based on the direct analysis data. For an effective comparison the vaporizers are the only variables in the sampling system. Both systems use the same accumulators, sample lines after vaporization, and the same Gas Chromatograph (GC). In Figure 3 the used installation is shown, both LNG vaporizers with probe were installed on the same impact probe on the LNG-transfer line.

ASaP's LNG sample probe - The Phazer LNG probe-vaporizer Phazer installed
Figure 3 On-site photograph of the installed systems used for the test

The experiment tests the stability of the systems during operation. All valves were fixed in position to prevent any interference. Unfortunately, not all data could be used due to commissioning works. Four datasets were selected, 2 for each sampler, and combined assuming the sample to be a constant factor. The data is plotted for visual inspection, also normality, means, and deviation were calculated.

The data for the field study of the LNG sample probes was collected during a real LNG ship-to-ship transfer in the port of Dubai. Data was only used on condition no works were being executed, parcel was loading, and cooling down was finished. Data for measured components Carbondioxide, iButane, nButane, NeoPentane, iPentane, nPentene, and Hexane were negligible. This data was computed but did not render significant results due to the low concentrations and were therefore omitted. The GHV was computed by the GC, the influence of these components on the GHV is included in the results.

LNG probe vaporizers Field study results and discussion

Figure 4 to Figure 7 show the plotted results of the stability runs for both systems for methane, ethane, propane and the GHV. Optical inspection reveals the signal is more ‘calm’ for the system 1 compared to system 2. The greater difference between consecutive measurements can be expressed as the line length. In system 2 the signal line length is 4.2, 4.1, 1.6, 0.7, and 3.8 times longer for methane, ethane, propane, nitrogen, and the GHV respectively. Another visual indicator is the reported concentration ranges, (highest – lowest) which are greater for system 2.

 
ASaP LNG probe vaporizer field study graph2
 
ASaP LNG probe vaporizer field study graph3

Figure 4 Combined methane signal for system 1 (left) and system 2 (right)

 
ASaP LNG probe vaporizer field study graph4
 
ASaP LNG probe vaporizer field study graph5

Figure 5 Combined ethane signal for system 1 (left) and system 2 (right)

 
ASaP LNG probe vaporizer field study graph6
 
ASaP LNG probe vaporizer field study graph7

Figure 6 Combined propane signal for system 1 (left) and system 2 (right)

 
ASaP LNG probe vaporizer field study graph8
 
ASaP LNG probe vaporizer field study graph9

Figure 7 Combined Gross Heating Value for system 1 (left) and system 2 (right)

Normality testing was done with a Lilliefors test since the true mean (µ) and deviation (σ) were unknown11. The results are displayed in Table 1. The data found using system 2 was found to be not normally distributed on the majority of measured parameters. It was decided to continue with the data assuming non-normality for all datasets. A normal distribution is expected to be found in the datasets by virtue of the following arguments: the sample should be homogeneous; fully mixed and of constant quality. The systematic error in the GC is normally distributed and in theory it should be possible to find this distribution in the data. With both systems non-normally distributed results are found, although system 1 performs better on methane and ethane.

The consequence of non-normal distributions is that the standard deviation (s) and mean () cannot be compared with the use of parametric statistics such as: F-, Chi-, or T-tests. Though they can be compared with the use of non-parametric statistics with less statistical power. In this experiment the means were compared with the use of a Wilcoxon sign rank test12, and variance with the use of Levene’s robust test for equality of variances13. These data is shown in Table 2.

 System 1 System 2 
 Dataset 1 (n=52)Dataset 2 (n=47)Dataset 1 (n=47)Dataset 2 (n=52)
MethaneNormalNormalNot normalNot normal
EthaneNormalNormalNot normalNot normal
PropaneNot normalNormalNot normalNot normal
NitrogenNot normalNot normalNot normalNormal
Gross Heating ValueNormalNot normalNot normalNot normal

Table 1 Results of Lilliefors test for normality

 System 1 (n=99) System 2 (n=99) Means comparedVariance compared
 Mean of measurementsMean absolute deviationMean of measurementsMean absolute deviationWilcoxon α=0.05Levene’s α=0.05
Methane (mol%)93.4760.04693.5000.089DifferentDifferent
Ethane (mol%)6.3150.0536.2870.093DifferentDifferent
Propane (mol%)0.01240.00020.01150.0003DifferentEqual
Nitrogen (mol%)0.1970.01080.2020.0161DifferentDifferent
Gross Heating Value (MJ/nM3)39.5200.01839.5090.029DifferentDifferent

Table 2 Means with deviation and Wilcoxon and Levene’s test results for system 1 and 2

In Table 2 the average measured concentrations on both systems is shown. When compared in a Wilcoxon test these means are found to be significantly different from each other. It thus makes sense to note the reported value of ethane, propane, and the GHV is higher on system 1, whereas methane and nitrogen have a higher value on system 2.

The precision of the mean, expressed as the mean absolute deviation, is also shown in Table 2. The Levene’s test reveals that for methane, ethane, nitrogen, and the GHV the deviation is significantly different. The concentration measurement for propane is not found to be significantly different. It can be said that measurements done on system 1 are equally or more precise than those on system 2.

When these results of the LNG sample probes are compared with our expectations about the influence of partial vaporization on the analysis results we find the following. On system 2 higher concentrations of lighter components are found, nitrogen and methane, accompanied with a lower GHV. Also a higher deviation compared to system 1 and non-normal distributions can be found in the data. These might be indications that partial LNG vaporization is occurring in system 2.

Other reasons for differences in the mean can be found in the assumption the sample quality is equally distributed over the complete loading. It is likely all liquid hydrocarbons are fully mixed with each other, though the immense volume of an LNG-cargo ship might have some adverse and unforeseen effects. Process flow and temperature, ambient temperature, front or back position in the process bypass, or whether it rains or not might have an influence on the performance of the systems. To be able to compare the data as matched pairs the measurements should be done at the same time while continuously changing between the systems. At the time of the experiment this was impossible, in the future such an experimental setup could improve the data.

The main issue with this comparison is that we can only indicate for one of the systems whether or not partial evaporation might be happening. There is no reference material to which we can measure the functionality of the better system. To test these setups independent from each other a testing facility is needed, as described in the NEN-EN 12838 standard14. Such testing facility is currently being built in the Netherlands for research purposes. At this test site the LNG vaporizers will all be measured against a common denominator.

Field study – LNG vaporization with LNG probe vaporizers references

  • (1)         Groupe International des Importateurs de Gaz Naturel Liquéfié. LNG Custody Transfer Handbook (second edition); 2001.
  • (2)         Normcommissie 310 066 “Debiet- en hoeveelheidsmeting.” NEN-ISO 8943; 2007; Vol. maart.
  • (3)         Atkins, P.; Jones, L. Chemical Principles; W. H. Freeman, 2008.
  • (4)         Air Liquide. Methane Vapor Pressure https://encyclopedia.airliquide.com/images_encyclopedie/VaporPressureGraph/Methane_Vapor_Pressure.GIF (accessed Apr 20, 2016).
  • (5)         Air Liquide. Ethane Vapor Pressure https://encyclopedia.airliquide.com/images_encyclopedie/VaporPressureGraph/Ethane_Vapor_Pressure.GIF (accessed Apr 20, 2016).
  • (6)         Air Liquide. Propane Vapor Pressure https://encyclopedia.airliquide.com/images_encyclopedie/VaporPressureGraph/Propane_Vapor_Pressure.GIF (accessed Apr 20, 2016).
  • (7)         Openmodelica. Two phase flow @ build.openmodelica.org https://build.openmodelica.org/Documentation/Modelica.Fluid.Dissipation.PressureLoss.StraightPipe.dp_twoPhaseOverall_DP.html (accessed Apr 21, 2016).
  • (8)         Technifab. Cryogenic Liquid Flow @ technifab.com https://technifab.com/cryogenic-resource-library/cryogenic-thermodynamics/cryogenic-liquid-flow/ (accessed Apr 21, 2016).
  • (9)         Filina, N. N.; Weisend, J. G. Cryogenic Two-Phase Flow: Applications to Large Scale Systems; Cambridge university press, 1996.
  • (10)      Visser, H.-P. LNG sample take-off, vaporization and sampling, 2014, 23.
  • (11)      Lilliefors, H. W. J. Am. Stat. Assoc. 1967, 62 (318), 399–402.
  • (12)      Hollander, M.; Wolfe, D. A.; Chicken, E. Nonparametric statistical methods; John Wiley & Sons, 2013.
  • (13)      Levene, H. Contrib. to Probab. Stat. Essays Honor Harold Hotell. 1960, 2, 278–292.
  • (14)      Technical Committee CEN/TC 282. NEN-EN 12838:2000 Installations and equipment for liquefied natural gas – Suitability testing of LNG sampling systems; 2000.

Need help choosing your next LNG vaporization solution?

Custody Transfer

Service engineer Vinicius Rossetti with ASaP LNG Sampler with AIM predictive maintenance software

Cryogenic Sampling

ASaP LNG Sampler and the Phazer LNG-Probe Vaporizer

Natural gas analyzers

Process gas chromatograph analyzers PGCs ABB NGC8206 Yokogawa GC8000 Honeywell EnCal 3000 Emerson Rosemount 370xa Process gas chromatograph analyzers PGCs

Mercury sampling

Integrated Mercury sampling HMI with intuitive user software

Need help choosing your next LNG vaporization solution?

Contact our LNG vaporization specialist directly

You can contact us is you have a question about LNG vaporization when it suits you. See our specialist’s contact information below.

Hans-Peter Visser - ASaP - Address and contact persons

🔧

📨

📞

🔗

Let our LNG vaporization specialist contact you

Let us know how we can reach you to discuss LNG vaporization. We will only use this information for contacting you.

Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.
Name
Newsletter

LNG vaporization practical solutions

With LNG vaporization ASaP offers practical total solutions. The well-established and complementary ASaP analytical package of services and products is an important contribution to the right solutions for your analytical needs. Moreover, the team spirit and the cooperation with specific partners give us the opportunity to design, build, locally install and commission tailor made sample probes, analyzer systems and shelters for you. All these products and systems can be built according to the latest industry guidelines and certifications.

ASaP is the reputable provider of analytical solutions; We can provide you with a full-service package for including engineering, manufacturing, software development, offshore service, gas analyzers, system integration, and cutting-edge bio-LNG or LNG Custody Transfer Systems (CTMS), LNG Probe-Vaporizers, advanced LNG Sampling Systems, and precise natural gas analysis systems. You are kindly invited to consult our team about LNG vaporization or any analytical challenge!

Other links Related to LNG vaporization